Training Article

Multiple Authors
By: Vip Vyas, Diego Nannicini

Is your enterprise dominated by passive thinking and prescribed routines? Or is it one that generates fresh thinking and unlocks insights into the future?

The viral popularity of TED Talks—with more than a billion views to date—highlights the innate hunger we have for discovering breakthrough ideas.

When it comes to making that high-stakes decision or tackling the most pressing challenges facing your firm, whose experience, inspiration, and insights do you seek? Just as important, why do you look up to those particular individuals or organizations? What do they possess that draws your attention?

What if this wisdom and intelligence resided in your own organization? What does it take to become a thought leader within one's firm?

William A. Levinson’s picture

By: William A. Levinson

Anthony Chirico1 describes how narrow-limit gauging (NLG, aka compressed limit plans) can reduce enormously the required sample size, and therefore the inspection cost, of a traditional attribute sampling plan. The procedure consists of moving acceptance limits t standard deviations inside the engineering specifications, which increases the acceptable quality level (AQL) and therefore reduces the sample size necessary to detect an increase in the nonconforming fraction.

Chris Woolston’s picture

By: Chris Woolston

More than a decade has passed, but Mary Mawritz can still hear metal-tipped tassels flapping against leather loafers—the signature sound of her boss roaming the halls of his real estate company.

Tara García Mathewson’s picture

By: Tara García Mathewson

Once students learn how to sound out words, reading is easy. They can speak the words they see. But whether they understand them is a different question entirely. Reading comprehension is complicated. Teachers, though, can help students learn concrete skills to become better readers. One way is by teaching them how to think as they read.

Manfred Kets de Vries’s picture

By: Manfred Kets de Vries

Recently, I was listening to the CFO of a large industrial firm who complained nonstop about her CEO. At the start of his tenure, the CEO regularly interacted with his top team but now seemed to spend most of his time brooding in his office. In meetings, he would often lose focus, have fits of anger, and harass people.

The CEO’s mercurial style was affecting morale and, increasingly, sales. Some subordinates wondered whether their CEO was falling apart in front of their eyes.

Stuart Hearn’s picture

By: Stuart Hearn

Managers have a profound effect on employee engagement. This is something we have known for quite a few years. According to a 2015 Gallup poll, managers account for at least a 70-percent variance in employee engagement scores. When employees and managers have a healthy, respectful, and honest relationship, employees feel more supported and better able to perform the function of their job.

Multiple Authors
By: Claire Harbour-Lyell, Antoine Tirard

Born to a Dalit family, Megha was raised in Southwest India and learned English at her convent school. As a child, she aspired to be a fashion designer or a cardiologist, but her parents insisted that she become an IT engineer. After four years of higher education, Megha found a job in the booming technology sector.

Jesse Lyn Stoner’s picture

By: Jesse Lyn Stoner

I had the pleasure of interviewing Whitney Johnson, author of the book, Build an A Team: Play to Their Strengths and Lead Them Up the Learning Curve (Harvard Business Review Press, 2018).

Multiple Authors
By: Henrik Bresman, Deborah Ancona

A leading supermarket chain in an eastern European Union country feared an 8-percent drop in sales as discounting giant Lidl was about to enter its market. So, in collaboration with researchers, it decided to run a randomized controlled experiment. The goal was to reduce its costly personnel turnover problem in a bid to improve quality and operational efficiency.

Multiple Authors
By: Stephen Fankhauser, Matt Ebbatson

The world is running out of experienced pilots. Supply is not keeping up with the growing demand for air travel. In Australia, the effects are already starting to bite. Even flagship carrier Qantas is having problems. In recent months it has had to perform a very nimble tap dance to crew its vast fleet and maintain its extensive flight schedule.

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