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Improving the Customer Experience With New Standards for Call Centers Just Published

ISO 18295–1 and –2 include requirements for contact centers and for clients using centers services

Published: Wednesday, August 2, 2017 - 11:00

(ISO: Geneva) -- We all know the frustration of phoning a call center, only to be put on hold for an interminable amount of time or taken through a long and complex series of options before arriving at a dead end. And when we finally get hold of someone, it is usually to battle with the language barrier or be told to call back later—all while paying an extortionate rate for the call itself.

A survey amongst ISO members suggests that the general public is, on average, only mildly satisfied with customer contact centers, indicating there is much room for improvement. It is for this reason that two new International Standards on the subject have just been published.

ISO 18295-1:2017—“Customer contact centers—Part 1: Requirements for customer contact centers”, specifies best practice for all contact centers, whether in-house or outsourced, on a range of areas to ensure a high level of service; these include communication with customers, complaints handling and employee engagement.

Click here for larger image.

Complementing this, ISO 18295-2:2017—“Customer contact centers—Part 2: Requirements for clients using the services of customer contact centers,” is aimed at those organizations making use of the services of a customer contact center to ensure their customers’ expectations are being met through its effective engagement. It provides guidance on the types of information the organization needs to provide to achieve high levels of customer engagement.

Zainuddin Hussein, chair of ISO/PC 273, the project committee in charge of ISO 18295, said it considered and addressed many customer concerns when developing the standards, such as waiting times, means of contacting the company and customer experience expectations.

“The committee established that there are already some regulations and national standards present in some countries,” Hussein said. “Our research showed that where they were implemented, customer satisfaction improved.

“The new standards bring together international best practice that can improve the service offering and customer experience even more, while also providing a framework on which future national standards can be based,” added Hussein.

ISO 18295-1 and ISO 18295-2 were developed by project committee ISO/PC 273, Customer contact centers, whose secretariat is held by SABS, ISO’s member for South Africa. They are now available from your national ISO member or through the ISO Store.

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The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is the world’s largest developer and publisher of international standards. ISO is a network of the national standards institutes of 162 countries, one member per country, with a Central Secretariat in Geneva, Switzerland, that coordinates the system. ISO is a nongovernmental organization that forms a bridge between the public and private sectors. ISO enables a consensus to be reached on solutions that meet both the requirements of business and the broader needs of society. View the ISO Standards list.