Featured Product
This Week in Quality Digest Live
Innovation Features
Klaus Wertenbroch
As algorithms increasingly become gatekeepers, where should rejected customers turn for an explanation?
Robert Sanders
New initiative plans to scale up bioengineering to create polymers, materials, films, and other products
Anju Dave Vaish
Consumers have unleashed their creativity during lockdown. Some clever brands have noticed.
Eric Whitley
Purple deploys lean execution system to improve maintenance and production metrics
Judith Su
Light is key to ultrasensitive chemical sensors

More Features

Innovation News
NSF-funded project is developing a model to help manufacturers pivot and produce personal protective equipment
Despite being far from campus because of the pandemic, some students are engineering a creative way to stay connected
What continual improvement, change, and innovation are, and how they apply to performance improvement
Good quality is adding an average of 11 percent to organizations’ revenue growth
Start with higher-value niche markets; don’t cross the valley of death
Program to provide tools to improve school performance and enrollment
Liquid-entrenched smooth surface (LESS) coating repels bacteria that stink and infect
Leader in workplace productivity introduces document automation product
Help drive team productivity with customizable preprinted templates

More News

Judith Su

Innovation

A Tiny Circular Racetrack for Light Can Rapidly Detect Single Molecules

Light is key to ultrasensitive chemical sensors

Published: Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 11:02

My Little Sensor Lab at the University of Arizona develops ultrasensitive optical sensors for medical diagnostics, medical prognostics, environmental monitoring, and basic science research. Our sensor technology identifies substances by shining light on samples and measuring the index of refraction, or how much light is slowed down when it passes through a material that is different from one substance to another—say, water and a DNA molecule.

The big idea

Our technology lets us detect extremely low concentrations of molecules down to one in a million-trillion molecules and can give results in under 30 seconds.

Ordinarily, index of refraction is too subtle to detect in a single molecule, but using a technology we developed, we can pass light through a sample thousands of times, which amplifies the change. This makes our sensor among the most sensitive in existence.

The device includes a tiny ring that light races around—240,000 times in 40 nanoseconds, or billionths of a second. A liquid sample surrounds the sensor. Some of the light extends outside of the ring, where it interacts with the sample thousands of times.


The single-molecule sensor, magnified 1,700 times in this image, is narrower than the diameter of the average human hair. Light races around the ring at the top. Credit: Little Sensor Lab, University of Arizona, CC BY-NC-ND

Unlike other very sensitive detection methods, ours is label-free, meaning that we don’t have to add any radioactive tags or fluorescent labels to identify what we are trying to detect. This means we don’t have to process our samples as much.

Because our sensor is so sensitive, we require only small amounts of a substance, which is useful both for reducing costs and in cases where reagents are difficult to obtain.

Why it matters

Some diseases, like cancer, can progress silently, avoiding detection until it’s too late. An ultrasensitive sensor could detect a disease before symptoms appear, letting healthcare providers treat the disease early, when it’s still curable. The sensor could also be used in a Covid-19 breath test.

Having a rapid and sensitive sensor can also enable monitoring of disease progression and can quantify the effect of different treatments. Our lab, for example, currently works on detecting low concentrations of biomolecules that indicate Alzheimer’s disease or cancer in blood, urine, and saliva samples.

Other research in this field

Many other approaches require that you either fluorescently “tag” the thing that you’re trying to detect, or amplify DNA using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For instance, current Covid-19 testing requires you to choose between a rapid antigen test, which is not as accurate, or a PCR test, which is accurate but expensive and time-consuming.

Active areas of research in this field also include ways to improve sample delivery to the sensor, which can improve the response time and reduce the amount of the target substance needed for detection. Researchers are also working on methods to improve sensor selectivity, which means the sensor can better distinguish the target substance from other substances. This reduces false positives.

What’s next

In October 2020, our lab received a $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to improve the sensor. The next step after demonstrating that our devices work in a research setting would be to move to clinical trials.

In addition, we are continually improving our sensor to make it more sensitive and more selective. We are also working on using the sensor to make a portable, point-of-care medical diagnostic device that could be used for at-home care or given to an EMT in an ambulance or a soldier on a battlefield.The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Discuss

About The Author

Judith Su’s picture

Judith Su

Judith Su is an assistant professor of biomedical engineering and optical sciences at the University of Arizona. her background is in imaging, microfabrication, and optical instrument-building for biological and medical applications.